Bay Laurel

$26

Description

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Effortless Cooking and Fragrance

Why Bay Laurels?

An outstanding, fragrant tree that wows – the Bay Laurel is second to none. Use the Sweet Bay Laurel (Laurus nobilis) Tree as an ornamental, or as a part of your cooking spice collection. This versatile, amazing little variety has an array of uses and can even be trained as a topiary.

Even better? The Bay Laurel thrives in a container, too. Basically, this hardy evergreen shrub has the strength to match its good looks. Plus, it’s known for its unique, refreshing fragrance and glossy, dark-green leaves that will add interest to your porch, patio, balcony or landscape. During the summer months, it produces small black fruit that attracts birds for a show of graceful wildlife.

It’s probably best known, however, as a favorite spice. Chances are that you have a spaghetti recipe that includes bay leaves. Fresh or dried Bay Laurel leaves can be used as a cooking spice and are often added to traditional Mediterranean dishes such as soups, stews and fish dishes. Their mild flavor enhances the taste of vegetables, meat, and poultry, with dried leaves retaining their flavor for several months.

Planting & Care

1. Planting: When planting your Bay Laurel, find a location that offers full to partial sun (4 to 8 hours of sunlight per day). This tree can adapt to a wide variety of soil type as long as it drains well. When you’re ready to plant, dig a hole that’s three times the width of the root ball and slightly shallower than the root ball.

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Hold the tree straight as you begin to backfill the site tamping down the soil as you go. Back fill the hole, apply water to settle the soil and remove the air pockets.

When selecting a container for your bay laurel, be sure it has plenty of holes in the bottom as drainage is essential. The pot size should be 2 times the size of the one it initially came in.

2. Watering: Stick your finger into the potting soil down to a depth of 2 inches and feel around for any moisture. If the soil is drying out, go ahead and water it until you see it escaping the drainage holes and then stop, or until your ground-planted Bay Laurel’s soil is moist. If there is some moisture present, leave it be until the soil dries a bit more.

3. Fertilizing: Considering the Bay Laurel is slow growing, it doesn’t require a great deal of food. However, container plants needs to be fed in spring and maybe again in mid-summer. When fertilizing, a general purpose fertilizer (such as a 10-10-10 formula) is sufficient.

4. Pruning: Bay Laurel should be pruned with a shears in late winter, removing dead and crossing branches and stems, and shaping the tree to the size and form that you desire.

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