Bushel and Berry Raspberry Shortcake Bush

$49

Description

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Compact Raspberry Bush is Perfect for Containers

Pick Large Amounts of Delicious Raspberries from a Giant Bush.

Here’s the problem with raspberries… they grow on long, skinny canes that need to be supported on trellises and spaced out in order to get a decent crop. They have thorns that make them tough to pick and some varieties make you wait an entire extra year because they can only produce on mature canes.

The Bushel and Berry™ Raspberry Shortcakesolves all these problems. It grows in a dense bush form that can give you more fruit than a small row of lanky canes. It thrives in a container or the ground, producing fruit on thick new growth. You get a great crop year after year without the work or hassle.

This is an exceptional tasting raspberry. It’s full sized with a great texture. They named it “shortcake” because of how sweet it is. Around July, your bushes start to look like small fruit factories… pumping out bright red berries against that lush green backdrop. You can pick for weeks and never have to worry about thorns.

Your bush grows about 3 ft. tall. Ideal for a back deck, where you can walk out each morning and pick fresh raspberries for your breakfast. The larger your container, the larger your plant will grow. But if you really want to get creative… this is a bright looking shrub. Plant them on each side of your front entrance or even as a foundation hedge. In the fall you will start seeing your leaves turning autumn colors. Plant several for a hedge that will give you enough berries to freeze throughout the year as well as share with friends and family.

Planting & Care

The Bushel and Berry (Rubus idaeus ‘NR7’ PP22141) is a dwarf variety offering an abundance of juicy red raspberries in a beautiful bush form, ideal for ground or containers, no trellis required! This bush matures to a height of 2-3 feet tall and 3-4 feet wide but produces like a regular raspberry and best of all, it’s thornless! The berry bush is best planted in USDA growing zones 5-9 with a full sun exposure location. It’s a moderately fast grower, somewhat drought tolerant and cold hardy to temps down to -10 degrees when planted in ground.

Location: Choose a location that offers full sun and gives the raspberries good air circulation. Areas that encounter high winds can pose a threat to the canes and should be avoided. Also, be sure there are no wild blackberries growing nearby which could spread diseases that can prove harmful to your plant. The soil should be nutrient dense and well-draining.

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Planting Instructions: Black raspberries and red raspberries must be planted at least 100 feet from each other to prevent cross pollination.

1) If possible, plant your raspberries early in the spring. If you live in a warmer area of the country plant in late winter.
2) A week before you plant, prepare the soil with compost or aged manure, plants prefer slightly acidic soil.
3) Dig a hole twice the width and the same depth as the root ball.
4) For multiple plants, space raspberries about 3 feet apart, in rows 8 feet apart.
5) A trellis or a fence can provide extra support for growth. If you chose to use this option, do it from the beginning of planting so the plants are not disturbed when maturing.

Watering: Water your raspberry plant at a rate of 1 inch of water per week. Increase water as necessary during dry periods but do not over water.

Pruning: When the new green canes grow in the spring and summer, trim to 6 to 12 inches to promote branching (and a bigger crop). After that, no pruning is necessary until fruiting is complete. When fruiting is complete, remove these canes.

Fertilizer: You can use compost with a small amount of balanced organic fertilizer, applying late in the winter. It’s also a good idea to spread mulch in the planting area to maintain moisture and discourage weed growth.

Pests: Raspberries are not prone to many diseases but are susceptible to powdery mildew. The fungus can rob raspberries of vital nutrients and weaken the plant. The disease looks like a dusting of flour and usually starts off in circular white spots. If left untreated, the plant’s leaves will begin to yellow and dry out. To treat, remove all infected leaves/fruit and make sure never to use these parts as compost. Use a fungicide which contains sulfur or neem oil.

Tips:
*If you don’t want to trellis your raspberries, just let them grow in a slightly arched position so they have ample room as the fruit ripens.
*Prune away the shoots that grow up from the roots as well as old or damaged canes which will better enable the surviving canes to produce lots of berries.
*Raspberries are susceptible to some of the same diseases as tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and potatoes so don’t plant them in an area where members of the Solanaceae family have recently grown.

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